Bears and Electric Fencing:

1 CITY OF BONNERS FERRY Bears and Electric Fencing: A starter s guide for using electric fencing to deter bears2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction. 2 How...

Author:  Lauren Simon
0 downloads 0 Views 902KB Size

CITY OF BONNERS FERRY

                                         

Bears and Electric Fencing: A starter’s guide for using   electric fencing to deter bears 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction…………………………………………………………………………….……………………………………………………2  How Electric Fencing Works …………………………………………………….……………………………………………………2  Getting Started………………………………………………………………………….………………………………………………….3  Energizers..………………………….…………………………………………………..…………………………………………………..4   

How much “power” do you need?.......................................................................................4 

 

Plug‐in or battery operated?...............................................................................................4 

Grounding Systems………………………………………………………………….……..……………………………………….…..4   

All‐hot fences………………………………………………………………….…………………………………………….….5 

 

Hot/ground fences……………………………………………………………….…………………………………….…….6 

Wire and Panels…………………………………………………………………………………………………….……….……………7  Posts…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...9  Fence Testers……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….………9  General Specifications…………………….………………………………………………………………………………….………..9  Application Ideas………………………………………….……………………………………………………………..……………..10  Tips……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..10  Resources.…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..11 

INTRODUCTION A properly constructed electric fence is safe for people and pets  and has proven to be effective at  deterring bears from apiaries (beehives), fruit trees, gardens, livestock pens, rabbit hutches, garbage  containers, dog kennels, chicken coups, compost piles, storage sheds, along with numerous other uses.  There is an abundant variety of applications and effective fencing designs for deterring bears. Design,  construction and proper maintenance will determine the effectiveness of your electric fence.    Safety is always a concern when using electrified equipment. Modern electric fence energizers have  been shown to be safe for humans, animals and vegetation. The pulse rate of a modern energizer is so  quick that they cannot generate enough heat to start vegetation on fire. While touching an electrified  fence is unpleasant, modern energizers are safe to use around pets and children.     

HOW ELECTRIC FENCING WORKS When an animal touches an electrified wire and the ground simultaneously, the electricity passes  through them, into the soil, to the ground rod and back to the ground terminal of the energizer. The  circuit is then completed and the animal receives a shock (Fig 1.). If too few grounding rods are placed,  if the grounding rod(s) is not deep enough, or if soil is generally dry, the electricity will not find the  path back to the energizer and the animal will receive little or no shock.   2

                                 

Figure 1. A bear completes the electrical circuit and receives a shock 

    Bears, and other non‐jumping animals, will require a fence design that they cannot climb through or go  under. This generally requires using multiple electrified wires (5 or more), a combination of electrified  wires and an existing fencing, or electrified wires and rigid wire panels.     

Getting Started A few things to consider before starting:  • Is your need for an electric fencing temporary (seasonal) or permanent (year round)? The answer  will determine some of your material choices (i.e. aluminum wire vs poly‐wire, wooden posts vs T‐ posts, etc.).  • How big is the area you want to fence? Does it measure in feet, acres, or miles? Measure to  determine how powerful of an energizer you will need (i.e. 1‐14 joules) to cover the distance of  large acreages (and the proper guage of aluminum wire that will be needed to prevent resistance),  compared to an 0.7‐1.0 joule energizer for smaller designs.  • Prior to purchasing materials, check with your local wildlife biologist, or electric fencing retailer,  for information on products that are appropriate for excluding bears.    The primary components of electric fences are: 1. Energizer 2. Grounding system 3. Wire 4. Posts 5. Fence tester There are other components that may be necessary for your fence, such as gate handles, drive through  gates and on/off throw switches. These can be added as needed for your particular fencing design.    3

1. Energizers Energizers (also called chargers or controllers) are the power source for the electric fence. Energizers  come in a wide variety of makes and models. The appropriate energizer depends on what type of  animal is being controlled and how large of an area it needs to cover. Energizers store energy and  deliver very short pulses of electricity, about one pulse per second, through the fence system.     How much “power” do you need?  A energizers stored energy is measured in joules, which is similar to a horsepower rating in motorized  engines. The joule rating is the most important factor when choosing your energizer. Make sure that  the energizer has the appropriate joule rating for the animal you are trying to exclude. For example, if  you are trying to keep bears out, they will require a joule rating of greater than 0.7 for the electric  fence to be effective, while horses may only require 0.1 joules to keep them in.    For small areas, such as gardens, 2‐3 fruit trees, compost piles, dog pens, chicken coups, etc., you will  generally only need to make sure that your energizer has a joule rating between 0.7 – 1.0. However,  for larger areas, such as livestock pastures or orchards, you will need to make sure that your energizer  is also powerful enough to deliver its charge over the longer distance. For example, a energizer that is  powerful enough to deliver its charge through 20 acres of fencing will not necessarily also have a joule  rating of 0.7‐1.0 that is needed to exclude bears.    Plug‐in or battery operated?  There are 2 types of energizers available: plug‐ins and battery operated. A typical plug‐in energizer  directly connects into a 110 volt outlet (standard household current). Battery operated energizers  receive their power from 12‐volt deep cycle or marine batteries.    Wherever possible, plug‐in energizers are recommended for electric fencing. They require less  maintenance, receive a consistent output of power, and are typically less expensive than their battery  operated counter‐parts.    Battery operated energizers can be just as effective as plug‐in units. However, they require more  maintenance, as the battery must be regularly recharged for the fence to remain effective. Solar‐ panels can be added to a battery operated energizer to provide the battery with a continual source of  power. However, the location must receive enough sunlight to ensure that the solar panel can provide  a sustainable charge for the battery. The solar array must also be powerful enough to charge the deep  cycle batteriest that are used.   

2. Grounding System Grounding is the second most important component in the design of an electric fence. Without  proper grounding, the fence will fail and the energizer can be damaged in the process. You will need  one ground rod for every joule of your energizers output.     Ground rods should be driven in the soil near the energizer to a minimum depth of 6 feet. In very dry  soils, the rod may need to be driven even deeper than 6 feet. It is necessary to drive ground rods as  deep as possible so that the rod is in contact with the greatest amount of surface area, adequately  allowing the current to return to the energizer.     4

In locations where it is too difficult to drive a ground rod at least 6 feet deep, there are several options.  A ground rod can be driven at a shallow depth using a steep angle, or several rods can be placed in a  series, 10 feet apart. Frequently watering the soil around the ground rod may also allow for the  adequate return of energy back to the energizer.    Ground rods should be ½” ‐3/4” in diameter and made of galvanized steel. Non‐galvanized metals rusts  quickly and cause resistance, reducing its effectiveness. Painted rods, t‐posts or rusted metal are not  effective ground rods, as the paint and rust will act as a barrier. A ground rod clamp will be needed to  attach the wire running from the energizers ground terminal to the ground rod.    There are 2 types of grounding systems: A) All-Hot B) Hot/Ground   A) All-Hot Fences In an all hot fencing system, all of the fence wires are electrified, or hot. They are all connected to each  other and to the positive (+) or hot terminal on the energizer. The negative (‐) or ground terminal is  only connected to the grounding rod.  The animal only needs to be standing on the ground and to  touch one of the wires simultaneously in order to receive a shock (Fig 2.).                                     Figure 2. An all‐hot electric fence design. All wires are connected to each other and to the positive terminal on  the energizer.  

  This all‐hot design is only good for areas with damp or moist soil that will provide sufficient grounding.  Areas that are frequently watered, such as gardens or fruit orchards, or areas that are seasonally  fenced during rainy/wet times of the year are suitable for this design.    When designing fences to exclude bears, or other predators, it is important to place enough lines so  that the animal cannot pass under, through or over them. At least 5 lines are recommended in an all‐ hot design, placing the lines close enough together so an animal cannot pass between them without  5

receiving a shock. It is also important to place the wire closest to the ground low enough so that an  animal cannot easily dig under it without also receiving a shock.    B) Hot/Ground Fences A hot/ground fence consists of alternating hot (+) and ground (‐) wires (Fig 3.). All hot wires are  connected to the positive terminal on the energizer and all ground wires are connected to the negative  (ground) terminal on the energizer. The energizers negative terminal must also be connected to the  grounding rod. Rather than relying on the soil to complete the electrical circuit, this design directly  returns the current to the energizer through the wires. The animal must touch both a hot and a ground  wire to receive a full shock. This fence design should be used in dry or rocky soils, in locations where  there are poor grounding conditions, and in permanent, year‐round fence designs. The bottommost  and topmost wires should always be hot (+), therefore you will always need an odd number of wires in  a hot/ground design.                                       

Figure 3. A hot/ground electric fence design. All hot wires are connected to each other and to the positive  terminal on the energizer. All ground wires are connected to each other and to the negative terminal of the  energizer. 

  Remember that it is important to place enough lines so that an animal cannot pass under, over, or  through them without receiving a shock. When using a hot/ground design, it’s best to use at least 5  wires. This way the alternating hot (+) and ground (‐) wires are close enough together for the animal to  receive an effective shock when it tries to pass through.      There are many fence designs that can be created based on these two different wiring systems. Just  remember, no matter which wiring system or fencing design you chose, you must always connect the  energizer to a sufficient grounding rod for the fence to work properly and to prevent damage to the  energizer.       

6

3. WIRE (and Wire Panels) All metal wire should be used for permanent electric fencing and can be found in galvanized smooth  steel or aluminum. Steel wire is more difficult to work with, as it is typically used in high‐tensile fencing  designs, but it is strong and durable. Aluminum wire is easy to use and more conductive than steel  wire, but will break with repeated bending. Steel wire should be at least 14Ga or 12Ga, and aluminum  wire should be at least 14Ga.    For temporary, seasonal or portable electric fencing, you may consider using a type of “poly” wire (Fig  4). “Poly” wire consists of multi‐stranded aluminum or stainless steel wire braided within polyethylene.  “Poly” wire is flexible yet strong and can be unrolled and re‐rolled multiple times without breaking.  Because of electrical resistance, it is recommended that your “poly” wire has at least 9 strands of wire  imbedded within the polyethylene. “Poly” tape, which is flat, is usually less effective for bear exclusion  and is not recommended.                               

Figure 4. Two styles of electrical fencing “Poly” wires. 

    Using rigid wire panels  Depending on the size of the fence enclosure and application, rigid wire (cattle or hog) panels can be  used in addition to, or instead of traditional wire.     For example, panels can be raised off the ground by attaching them to fiberglass posts. The panels are  attached to each other and to the positive terminal of the energizer. The posts insulate the panels to  ensure that they remain “hot” (Fig 5.). Or the raised panels can also be used as the grounded wire in a  hot/ground fencing system (Fig 6.).    In very dry soil, hard ground, rock or pavement, additional panels can be laid on the ground beneath  any raised panels to ensure grounding of the animal. These on‐the‐ground panels should be connected  to the ground terminal of the energizer.       

7

                                           

    Figure 5. Electrified raised rigid wire panel  

                         

                          Figure 6. Grounded rigid wire panel with 3 offset electrified hot wires  

8

4. POSTS There are a number of different post types available for electric fencing, the most common being  wooden, metal T‐posts, fiberglass and plastic. Wooden and metal posts are typically more expensive  and require the added expense of insulators, however they are more durable than plastic and  fiberglass posts and require less overall maintenance.    The primary difference between permanent and temporary fencing is the choice of fence posts and the  extent to which they are installed. For stable, lower maintenance, permanent, year‐round fencing,  treated wooden posts are the best choice. Less permanent, year‐round fencing can be constructed  using fiberglass or T‐posts with wooden posts in corners for stability.     Temporary, seasonal or portable fences can be effective and economical, and can be taken down for  storage when not in use. They can be constructed with T‐posts, fiberglass posts, or step‐in‐the‐ground  plastic posts and have a wide range of applications. However, they will not hold up as well, or as long,  as fencing that uses rigid posts.    Wire insulators must be used to secure hot (+) wires strands to wooden and metal posts to prevent the  wire from grounding out. Plastic and fiberglass posts do not need insulators for the hot (+) wires and  may be directly attached to the posts. In hot/ground fence designs, the ground (‐) wires may be  directly attached to the posts.      5. FENCE TESTERS An important part of regular electrical fence maintenance is the use of an electric fence voltage meter,  commonly referred to as a fence tester. This small device not only tells you if your energizer and  grounding system is working, it tells you the amount of current passing through your electrical wires.  This is not the same as a voltage reader, which only tells you if electric current is passing through the  wire, not how much. However, to effectively deter bears, it is the how much that matters. Bears  require a minimum voltage requirement of 6,000 volts, or more, passing through each hot (+) wire.     Fence testers should be used to test if your fence is functioning properly immediately after setup and  then periodically thereafter as part of regular maintenance.    

9

Electric fence specifications for deterring grizzly and black bears Minimum Joule Requirement:   Minimum Voltage Requirement:   Minimum Fence Height:    Minimum # wires     

       

       

       

       

0.7 or more  6,000 or more  4 feet  5 

Some electrical fencing applications for excluding bears Apiaries        Garbage containers/dumpsters  Compost piles       Orchards/fruit trees      Sheds/storage areas     

         

         

Livestock pens  Dog kennels  Chicken coups  Gardens  Birdfeeders 

Some tips to improve the effectiveness of your electric fence •

The joule rating is the most important factor when choosing your energizer. 



Grounding is the second most important component in the design of an electric fence. 



If using a 12‐volt battery operated energizer, check that your battery is charged every week. Make  sure battery terminals are free of corrosion and are still connected to the fence and grounding rod. 



Check that hot wires are not grounded out by tall vegetation, fallen branches, broken insulators,  etc. 



Check for poor wire connections in locations where wire has been spliced or where wire has  become loose. 



When protecting a structure (shed, rabbit hutch, etc.) the fence should be placed 3‐5 feet away  instead of directly on the structure. This way the bear encounters the fence before reaching the  attractant. 



When protecting fruit trees, be sure to place the fence far enough away so that all fruit falls within  the electrical fence instead of outside it. 



Check voltage on every hot (+) wire with electric fence voltage tester, particularly in areas furthest  from the energizer, weekly. 



Place plastic electric fencing signs around the perimeter of your fence to improve visibility and  warn other people.   

10

RESOURCES Idaho Department of Fish and Game http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/   Northern Region IDFG contacts:  Brian Johnson    208‐267‐4085  Greg Johnson    208‐267‐7629  Wayne Wakkinen    208‐267‐3115  Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks http://fwp.mt.gov/wildthings/livingWithWildlife/BeBearAware  Contact a MFWP bear manager near you:  Region 1:  Libby    Kim Annis:     406‐293‐4161  Kalispell  Tim Manley:   406‐751‐4585  Kalispell  Erik Wenum:  406‐751‐4588  Region 2:  Missoula  Jamie Jonkel:   406‐542‐5508      Living With Wildlife Foundation http://www.lwwf.org  2009 Practical Electric Fencing Resource Guide: Controlling Predators      Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee (IGBC) http://www.igbconline.org     

We are grateful to Kim Annis, MFWP Bear Management Specialist, who authored this  brochure, created artwork, and assisted in fencing demonstrations across the Kootenai  River Basin.  Cover photo by Tim Thier.    Brochure edited and produced by the Kootenai Valley Resource Initiative (KVRI) Grizzly  Bear Committee and partners. Additional KVRI information and documents are available  at: http://www.kootenai.org/kvri.html    

11

Life Enjoy

" Life is not a problem to be solved but a reality to be experienced! "

Get in touch

Social

© Copyright 2013 - 2019 DOKUMENTIS.COM - All rights reserved.