Theater in Germany. An Exploration of German Theater for the Elementary Student

1 German Theater: An Exploration for the Young Student Theater in Germany An Exploration of German Theater for the Elementary Student Catherine Colagr...

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German Theater: An Exploration for the Young Student

Theater in Germany An Exploration of German Theater for the Elementary Student

Catherine Colagross Oxford Schools 1420 Lakeville Rd. Oxford, MI 48371 [email protected] 1

German Theater: An Exploration for the Young Student

The Unit Focus: The focus of this unit is German Theater and its importance in the daily lives of Germans.

Big Concepts: • •

Students will draw a theater building, perform Puppet Theater, sing German songs in German and in English, and also play homemade musical instruments to German Christmas Carols. Students will learn that many stories and songs in the United States came from Germany.

An Essential Understanding: •

Students will understand how important the theater is in Germany by learning that most towns have plays, operas, and instrumental performances.

Essential Questions: • How many theaters (not movie theaters) do we have in our town? Did you know that in Germany most every town has at least one theater and many have more than one? • How many of you have heard of Cinderella, Snow White, and Hansel and Gretel? Did you know that these come from Germany? • Did you know that German towns even have places for singers to perform? Most of these performances, known as operas, tell a story! • Have you ever seen a band or orchestra perform? Some of you may have heard high school bands at football games or even college bands on T.V.! In Germany, many towns have their own orchestras to play music for members of their community.

State Content Standard (s): Social Studies/Strand II Content Standard 1 People, Places and Cultures •

All students will describe, compare, and explain the locations and characteristics of places, cultures and settlements.

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German Theater: An Exploration for the Young Student

Social Studies/Strand VII Content Standard 1 Responsible Personal Conduct •

All students will consider the effects of an individual’s actions on other people, how one acts in accordance with the rule of law, and how one acts in a virtuous and ethically responsible way as a member of society.

Assessment Type: •

Students will be creating pictures (Theater Lesson One), performing puppet shows (Theater Lesson One), singing German and English Songs(Opera Lesson Two), making instruments and performing songs (Orchestra Lesson Three).

Short Scenario for the Individual Summative Assessment: •

Congratulations! You have just been asked to become a part of the German theater! As you learn about the theater you will create a theater building for your town, create a puppet for a puppet performance of one of the Grimm’s fairy tales, you will sing German songs in German and English, and you will make instruments to perform in your very own orchestra!

Directions/Criteria: •





Lesson One: Drawing o After viewing picture of German theaters (Overhead One), students will use worksheets to draw a German theater for their own town. o Drawings will be graded by the rubric following the lesson. Lesson One: Puppet Making o After listening to Grimm’s fairy tales, students will create brown bag puppets. o Puppets will be graded by the rubric following the lesson. Lesson One: Performing o Students will be asked to have their character act in the manner that he/she/it acted in the story. o Students will be graded by the rubric following the lesson.

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German Theater: An Exploration for the Young Student

• •

Lesson Two: Singing o Students will be singing in German and in English. o Students will be graded by the rubric following the lesson. Lesson Three: Orchestra Performance o Students will be performing in an orchestra and following directions given to them in the song. o Students will be graded by the rubric following the lesson.

Directions for the “Go Beyond”: •

Students will be given rubrics for each assignment.

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German Theater: An Exploration for the Young Student

Lesson One-The German Theater Essential Questions: •

How many theaters (not movie theaters) do we have in our town? Did you know that in Germany most every town has at least one theater and many have more than one? (Part A) • How many of you have heard of Cinderella, Snow White, and Hansel and Gretel? Did you know that these come from Germany? (Part B) Basic Facts and Knowledge: •

• •

• •

Explain to students that theater plays an important role in the German culture. “Even small towns boast opera houses and ballet troupes as well as theaters; overall there is a distinct Theater world, a well- established network of state, municipal, traveling, and private theaters.” (“Facts About Germany”) (Part A). Tell students that inside the theater buildings they may see plays, listen to operas, and hear orchestras playing music (Part A). The Grimm Brothers from Germany, Jacob and Wilhelm, listened to stories all around the country and set out to publish them in a book. Although they did not actually write the stories themselves, they rewrote and edited many of them (Part B). “The Brothers Grimm undertook the fairy-tale collection with the goal of saving the endangered oral tradition of Germany. (“Guardians of the Fairy Tale: The Brothers Grimm”) (Part B). Many of these tales have been made into theatrical productions (Part B).

Instructional Strategies (Part A): • • •

Ask the students the essential question: How many theaters (not movie theaters) do we have in our town? Did you know that in Germany most every town has at least one theater and many have more than one? Explain to them that the inside the theater buildings they may see plays, listen to operas, and hear orchestras playing music. Show them the pictures of some German theaters (Overhead One). Explain to them that some of the theater buildings have columns (Greek Style-older) and some have curvy designs (Modern Style).

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German Theater: An Exploration for the Young Student





Invite them to draw a theater for their own town! (Worksheets One and Two) Depending on how detailed you may want them to be, you may have them trace the patterns in Worksheet Two and make them out of construction paper OR you may just have them draw them with a pencil on white paper. After the theaters are drawn, invite them share them with the class.

Instructional Strategies (Part B) •

Once you have finished this project you may choose to start Part B of this lesson or you may wait until another day. • To begin Part B, ask the students the essential question: How many of you have heard of Cinderella, Snow White, and Hansel and Gretel? Did you know that these tales come from Germany? • Share one or more of Grimm’s Fairy Tales. • You may read one of the following tales: The Bremen Town Musicians, Snow White, Rapunzel, Hansel and Gretel, Cinderella, The Frog King. Depending on the age of your students, you may wish to read the tales from picture books or from chapter books. You may also click on this link to see more tales. http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~spok/grimmtmp/ • After you have read one or more tales, break the class into groups. You may wish to assign each group a tale you have read to them or a different Grimm tale. • Once groups are comfortable with their stories, they may begin to make puppets. They may use paper bags, Popsicle sticks, construction paper, etc. to complete their puppets. • Each group may choose to assign a reader to read the tale while the others perform the actions of the characters with their puppets OR the teacher may read the story and the students may act out the tale. Formative Assessment •

Students will be assessed using the following criteria o Evidence of understanding of how a building is drawn (Part A). o Evidence of their understanding of the tale based on the looks of the puppets created and the actions performed by the puppets. (Part B) o Rubrics are provided to assess both of these (Rubrics One and Two).

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German Theater: An Exploration for the Young Student

Resources Needed • •

Part A-Transparency One, Worksheets One and Two, white paper or construction paper, scissors, glue, pencils and/or crayons and/or markers, and Rubric One. Part B-Copies of Grimm’s Fairy Tales, materials for puppet construction (lunch sacks, yarn, construction paper, popsicle sticks, crayons, paint, paper, markers, scissors etc.) and Rubric Two.

Resources for Knowledge: •

Theater in Germany- “Facts About Germany” As retrieved from the World Wide Web on September 1, 2006 http://www.tatsachen-ueber-deutschland.de/en/culture-and-media/maincontent-09/theater.html



Pictures of German Theaters- As retrieved from the World Wide Web on September 1, 2006 http://members.virtualtourist.com



Information on Brother’s Grimm-“Guardians of the Fairy Tale: The Brothers Grimm” by Thomas O’Neill. As retrieved from the World Wide Web on September 2, 2006 http://www.nationalgeographic.com/grimm/article.html



List of Fairy Tales by the Brothers Grimm -As retrieved from the World Wide Web on September 2, 2006 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grimm's_Fairy_Tales



Copies of Grimm’s Fairy Tales (may be a bit complicated for younger students) -As retrieved from the World Wide Web on September 2, 2006 http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~spok/grimmtmp/

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German Theater: An Exploration for the Young Student

Lesson Two-The German Opera Essential Question: • Did you know that German towns even have places for singers to perform? Most of these performances, known as operas, tell a story! Basic Facts and Knowledge: • Many towns in Germany have their own opera companies. • Although it will not be possible to perform an opera with young students, they can sing some German songs! • Some basic German pronunciation would be good, but the German words are translated phonetically for you! Instructional Strategies : • • •



Ask the students the essential question: Did you know that German towns even have places for singers to perform? Most of these performances, known as operas, tell a story! Tell the students some basic facts and knowledge. Tell them that operas are stories that are sung! Tell them that they are like musicals, but that most are sung in Italian or German. Explain to the students that they will have the opportunity to sing three songs in English then in German. Read through the songs first with the students and ask them to tell you about the stories the songs tell. (Worksheet Three) Two of the Songs have links to the music. The second song, Abel, Babel, Goosebill can be chanted while the students throw the ball to each other.

Formative Assessment •

Students will be assessed using the following criteria o Evidence of participation o Evidence of word pronunciation o Rubrics are provided for this lesson (Rubric Three)

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German Theater: An Exploration for the Young Student Resources Needed •

Worksheet Three, Computer with Internet Access for melodies to go with the songs, ball for Song Two, and Rubric Three.

Resources for Knowledge: •

German/English Songs- “Mama Lisa’s World” ” As retrieved from the World Wide Web on September 4, 2006 http://www.mamalisa.com/world/germany.html



English Songs with Translations-“English Song Book” ” As retrieved from the World Wide Web on September 5, 2006. http://www.laukart.de/multisite/songbook/english.php#sleeping



Translations- Even though I, Catherine Colagross did the translations for the songs provided, you may use this website for other translations: As retrieved from The World Wide Web on September 10, 2006. http://german.about.com/library/blgerlab.htm

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German Theater: An Exploration for the Young Student

Lesson Three-The German Orchestra Essential Question

• Have you ever seen a band or orchestra perform? Some of you may have heard high school bands at football games or even college bands on T.V.! In Germany, many towns have their own orchestras to play music for members of their community. Basic Facts and Knowledge:

• “Over the centuries, Germany has produced many outstanding composers and musicians. Johann Sebastian Bach, Karl Maria von Weber, Franz Schubert, Ludwig van Beethoven, Johannes Brahms, Robert Schumann and Richard Wagner were Germans, as are more modern and contemporary composers Karl Orff, Helmut Lachenmann, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Hans Werner Henze and Kurt Weill.” (“German Embassy, Washington D.C.”) • Germany boasts 141 professional orchestras! (“Germany Embassy, Washington D.C.”)

Instructional Strategies:

• Ask the students the essential question: Have you ever seen a band or orchestra perform? Some of you may have heard high school bands at football games or even college bands on T.V.! In Germany, many towns have their own orchestras to play music for members of their community. • Tell the students that Germany is about the size of some states like Michigan and yet it has 141 professional orchestras! • Ask the students: “Have you heard of the names Back and Beethoven?” These people (from Germany) helped to write music for the orchestras to play! • Tell them that they are going to play in their own orchestra with their own homemade instruments! They will be playing their instruments along with German songs! • First you will have them make their instruments. There is a great website that can show kids how to make nine instruments. The link follows: http://www.kinderart.com/teachers/9instruments.shtml These can also be found in Worksheet Four.

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German Theater: An Exploration for the Young Student





Once they have made their instruments, they can play them in the two German songs, Jingle Bells and Silent Night, at the places indicated in Worksheet Five. The music to these songs can be found on the links provided at the end of the worksheet or a teacher may play them. Be creative with this assignment! Students will love playing in their own “professional orchestra!”

Formative Assessment •

Students will be assessed using the following criteria o Evidence of rhythm o Evidence of class participation o Rubrics are provided for this lesson (Rubric Four)

Resources Needed •

Worksheet Four, Worksheet Five, variety of resources to make instruments, Computer with Internet Access for melodies to go with the songs and Rubric Four

Resources for Knowledge: •

Knowledge about Orchestras in Germany - “German Embassy, Washington D.C.” As retrieved from The World Wide Web on September 12, 2006. http://www.germany.info/relaunch/culture/arts/performing_arts/music.html



Carols in German. -A resource for Carols written in English and German. As retrieved from The World Wide Web on September 12, 2006. http://german.about.com/library/blmus_jingleb.htm



Instrument making. -As retrieved from The World Wide Web on September 12, 2006. http://www.kinderart.com/teachers/9instruments.shtml

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German Theater: An Exploration for the Young Student

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Design a Theater for Your Town! Worksheet One After looking at pictures of theater houses in Germany, it’s time for you to design your own theater! You may make it look any way that you want. Be Creative!

Cut-Out Shapes for Theater Construction Worksheet Two

Opera-Songs for Children Worksheet Three Here’s a chance for you to sing some songs! You will first sing them in English and then you will sing them in German!

BROTHER JOHN/ARE YOU SLEEPING? (English) Are you sleeping? Are you sleeping, are you sleeping? Brother John, Brother John? Morning bells are ringing, morning bells are ringing ding ding dong, ding ding dong

BRUDER JACOB/SCHLÄFTS DU? (German)

Bruder (Brooder) Jakob (Yahkob), Bruder (Brooder) Jakob (Yahkob),, schläfts (schlaaafts) Du (do) noch (nawch) , schläftst (schlaaafts) Du (do) noch (nawch)? Hörst (horest) du (do) nicht (neeckt ) die (de) Glocken (glawken), Hörst (horest) du (do) nicht (neeckt ) die (de) Glocken (glawken) Ding (Din) Ding (Din) Dong (Dong), Ding (Din) Ding (Din) Dong (Dong),

Play the song on your computer by following the link below: http://www.laukart.de/multisite/songbook/songs/jakobdeutsch.mid

Links to More Songs: http://www.laukart.de/multisite/songbook/english.php#sleeping

ABEL, BABEL, GOOSE BILL (English) Abel Babel Goose bill how many children do you want: 1 2 3 4 5 ... (and so on until the ball doesn't bounce anymore.)

This song is recited as the child bounces the ball. With every bounce of the ball, recite another line. ABEL, BABEL, GÄNSESCHNABEL (German)

Abel, (Able) Babel, (Bable) Gänseschnabel, (Ganzschnawble) wieviel (Vefeel) Kinder (Kinder) willst (Villst) Du (Do) haben (Hahben): 1 (eyns) 2 (zfi) 3 (dry) 4(fear) 5 (funf) ... und (und) so (zo) weiter (vyter) Bis (bis) der (dare) Ball (Bal/) Nicht (neecht) mehr (mare) springt (shpringt)

ALL MY DUCKLINGS (English) All my ducklings are swimming on the lake, Swimming on the lake, Their little heads dip into the water, Their little tails stick out. All my little doves, Settle on the roof, Settle on the roof, Clipper, clapper, clap, clap, Fly over the roof.

ALLE MEINE ENTCHEN (German) Alle (Alle) meine (myne) Entchen (N tchin) schwimmen (schvimmin) auf (Owf) dem (dame) See (Zay), schwimmen (schvimmin) auf (Owf) dem (dame) See (Zay), Köpfchen (Cawpfchen) in (in) das (das) Wasser (Vasser), Schwänzchen (Schvantschen) in (in) die (de) Höh (Hoe). Alle (Alle) meine (myne) Täubchen (Tawbchin) Sitzen (Sĭtzen) auf (awf) dem (dame) Dach (dăch), Sitzen (Sĭtzen) auf (awf) dem (dame) Dach (dăch), Klipper (Clipper), klapper (Clapper), klapp (Clap) , klapp (clap), Fliegen (fleegen) übers (oobers) Dach (dach)

Play the song on your computer: http://www.mamalisa.com/world/allentch.mid Links to More Songs: http://www.mamalisa.com/world/germany.html

Musical Instruments Worksheet Four

9 Easy to Make Musical Instruments for Kids

Children love music as much as they enjoy making things. Why not join these two creative forces and make one or all of these fun and easy musical instruments to encourage play and creativity.

DECORATIVE ITEMS For any of these activities, you can leave the items plain or decorate them. If you need ideas for decorating these projects, try any of the following items. We are sure this list will help you think of even more items you can use. Combine different things such as buttons and glitter or sequins and yarn. Let the children's creativity surprise you! Keeping items such as these in a large plastic storage container makes for easy access and quick clean up. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

sequins buttons yarn ribbon masking tape beads glitter sand cellophane construction paper magazines photos crayons markers colored pencils paint nail polish

When you are finished constructing your instruments, have a camera ready to take a picture of the band. Record this activity in your child's scrapbook so you can look back in years to come.

TAMBOURINE • •

2 paper plates stapler or glue

• • • •

hole punch string jingle bells crayons

Staple or glue two paper plates together, facing each other. Using a hole punch, make holes around the plates and tie jingle bells to the holes with string. Decorate the tambourine with crayons. Shake to play. Note: Heavy duty paper plates may be more durable for this craft. Safety note: If using a stapler, an adult should do this. When finished be sure to cover the staples with scotch tape.

DRUM • • • • • • •

empty oatmeal box with cover yarn pen 2 pencils 2 spools construction paper crayons

Before beginning, you can decorate the oatmeal box with construction paper and/or crayons for a colorful effect. Place the cover on the box. Use a pen to make a hole in the center of the cover and in the center of the bottom of the box. Through these holes, pull a piece of yarn long enough to hang around child's neck and down to their waist. For the drumsticks, place the spools at the ends of the pencils, secure with glue if necessary. Beat to play.

CHIMES • • • • •

ruler or stick washers nail polish string mixing spoon

Hang the washers from the ruler or stick with pieces of string by wrapping the string around the ruler or stick and securing. Strike the washers with the mixing spoon to play. Note: You can make this craft colorful by painting the washers first with different color nail polishes, such as red, gold, glittery, etc. Parents should supervise this part of the activity closely.

HORN • • • •

paper towel roll waxed paper rubber band pen

Cover one end of the paper towel roll with waxed paper, secure it with a rubber band. Punch a row of holes along one side of the roll with the tip of a pen. To play, sing a tune into the open end of the horn. CYMBALS • •

two matching pot covers yarn or ribbon

Tie the ribbon or yarn around the handles of the pot covers. To play, strike together.

XYLOPHONE • • •

tall glasses or jars water mixing spoon

Fill the glasses or jars with different amounts of water. The more water in the glass, the lower the pitch will be. Having less water in the glass or jar will raise the pitch. To play, gently strike the glasses with a mixing spoon. Note: This instrument should probably be played by older children in "the band" because of the use of glass.

COMB BUZZER • •

pocket comb tissue paper

Fold a piece of tissue paper over the tooth edge of a comb. To play, hum through the tissue paper.

GUITAR • • •

empty shoe box rubber bands ruler or stick

Remove the cover from the box. Stretch the rubber bands around the box. Attach the ruler or stick to the back of the box on one end to act as the arm of the guitar.

To play, strum or pluck the rubber bands.

HAND BELLS • • • •

2 paper towel rolls hole punch 4 jingle bells string or yarn

Punch a hole in each end of the paper towel rolls. Tie two jingle bells to each side of the paper towel rolls by running string or yarn through the holes and carefully tying off. Shake to play. Have fun and let creativity and imagination run wild! Record the band's first song and play back for some great giggle time. Enjoy! © Amanda Formaro

BIO: Amanda Formaro is the mother of four children. She and her husband live in southern Nevada. She is also the owner of familycorner.com magazine at http://familycorner.com | email her at: [email protected]

German Orchestra Songs Worksheet Five Have the students play their instruments where they are indicated in red. If the instruments are indicated at the beginning of a stanza/line that means they are played throughout that line of music. These are just suggestions; experiment and see how your director skills move you!

Jingle Bells Traditional (hand bells, comb buzzer), Dashing through the snow in a one-horse open sleigh, (hand bells, comb buzzer)Over the fields we go, laughing all the way. (hand bells, comb buzzer)Bells on bob-tails ring (Horn), making spirits bright, (Horn) (hand bells, comb buzzer), What fun it is to ride and sing a sleighing song tonight. Chorus (chimes, tambourine, drum) Jingle bells, jingle bells, jingle all the way! (chimes, tambourine, drum) O what fun it is to ride in a one-horse open sleigh. (chimes, tambourine, drum) Jingle bells, jingle bells, jingle all the way! (chimes, tambourine, drum) O what fun it is to ride in a one-horse open sleigh. (cymbals) (hand bells, comb buzzer)A day or two ago, I thought I'd take a ride (hand bells, comb buzzer) And soon Miss Fanny Bright, was seated by my side; The horse was lean and lank, (Horn) misfortune seemed his lot(Horn); (hand bells, comb buzzer)He got into a drifted bank and we got upsot (Chorus) (hand bells, comb buzzer)A day or two ago, the story I must tell (hand bells, comb buzzer)I went out on the snow, and on my back I fell; (hand bells, comb buzzer)A gent was riding by, (Horn) in a one-horse open sleigh (Horn) (hand bells, comb buzzer)He laughed as there I sprawling lie but quickly drove away (Chorus) (hand bells, comb buzzer)Now the ground is white, go it while you're young (hand bells, comb buzzer)Take the girls tonight, and sing this sleighing song; (hand bells, comb buzzer)Just get a bob-tailed bay, (Horn) two-forty as his speed (Horn) (hand bells, comb buzzer)Hitch him to an open sleigh and crack! you'll take the lead (Chorus) Play the music on your computer by following the link below: http://www.christmas-carols.net/carols/jingle-bells.html

Silent Night : Lyrics Silent night, (xylophone) holy night (xylophone) All is calm, (chimes) all is bright (chimes) Round yon Virgin Mother and Child (xylophone) Holy Infant so tender and mild (xylophone) Sleep in heavenly peace (tambourine) Sleep in heavenly peace (tambourine)

Silent night, (xylophone) holy night! (xylophone) Shepherds quake (chimes) at the sight (chimes) Glories stream from heaven afar(xylophone) Heavenly hosts sing Alleluia! (xylophone) Christ, the Saviour is born(tambourine) Christ, the Saviour is born(tambourine)

Silent night, (xylophone) holy night(xylophone) Son of God, (chimes) love's pure light(chimes) Radiant beams from Thy holy face(xylophone) With the dawn of redeeming grace(xylophone) Jesus, Lord, at Thy birth(tambourine) Jesus, Lord, at Thy birth "(tambourine)

Play the music on your computer by following the link below: http://www.carols.org.uk/si1ent_night.htm

Drawing of a Theater Rubric One

Student Name: ________________________________________ CATEGORY 4 3 2 1 Drawing

Drawing is expressive and detailed. Shapes, patterns, shading and/or texture are used to make the theater look realistic.

Drawing is expressive and somewhat detailed. Little use has been made of pattern, shading, or texture. Student has basics, but had not "branched" out.

Drawing has few details. It is primarily representational with very little use of pattern, shading or texture. Student needs to improve control.

The drawing lacks almost all detail OR it is unclear what the drawing is intended to be. Student needs to work on control.

Time/Effort

Class time was used wisely. Much time and effort went into the planning and design of the theater. It is clear the student worked at home as well as at school.

Class time was used wisely. Student could have put in more time and effort at home.

Class time was not always used wisely, but student did do some additional work at home.

Class time was not used wisely and the student put in no additional effort.

Capturing A Style/Artist

The drawing shows evidence of good knowledge gained from pictures viewed from the overhead.

The drawing shows evidence of some knowledge gained from pictures viewed from the overhead.

The drawing shows little evidence of good knowledge gained from pictures viewed from the overhead.

The drawing shows no evidence of good knowledge gained from pictures viewed from the overhead.

Score

Puppet Making Rubric Two

Student Name: ________________________________________ CATEGORY 4 3 2 1 The student can answer 2 questions correctly about how the puppet relates to the culture or story being studied.

The student can answer 1 question correctly about how the puppet relates to the culture or story being studied.

The student does not understand how the puppet relates to the culture or story being studied.

Time and Effort Class time was used wisely. Much time and effort went into the planning and design of the puppet. It is clear the student worked at home as well as at school.

Class time was used wisely. Student could have put in more time and effort at home.

Class time was not always used wisely, but student did do some additional work at home.

Class time was not used wisely and the student put in no additional effort.

Working With Others

Usually listens to, shares, with, and supports the efforts of others. Does not cause "waves" in the group.

Often listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others, but sometimes is not a good team member.

Rarely listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others. Often is not a good team player.

Knowledge about Culture/Story

The student can answer 3 questions correctly about how the puppet relates to the culture or story being studied.

Almost always listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others. Tries to keep people working well together.

Score

English/German Songs Rubric Three

Student Name: CATEGORY 4

________________________________________ 3 2 1

Speaks Clearly

Sings clearly and distinctly all (10095%) the time, and mispronounces no words.

Sings clearly and distinctly all (10095%) the time, but mispronounces one word.

Sings clearly and distinctly most ( 94-85%) of the time. Mispronounces no more than one word.

Often mumbles or can not be understood OR mispronounces more than one word.

Enthusiasm

Facial expressions and body language generate a strong interest and enthusiasm about the topic in others.

Facial expressions and body language sometimes generate a strong interest and enthusiasm about the topic in others.

Facial expressions and body language are used to try to generate enthusiasm, but seem somewhat faked.

Very little use of facial expressions or body language. Did not generate much interest in topic being presented.

Volume

Volume is loud enough to be heard by all audience members throughout the song.

Volume is loud enough to be heard by all audience members at least 90% of the time.

Volume is loud enough to be heard by all audience members at least 80% of the time.

Volume often too soft to be heard by all audience members.

Individual : Orchestra Concert Rubric Four

Student Name: CATEGORY 4

________________________________________ 3 2 1

Rhythm

The beat is secure and the rhythms are accurate for the style of music being played.

The beat is secure and the rhythms are mostly accurate. There are a few duration errors, but these do not detract from the overall performance.

The beat is somewhat erratic. Some rhythms are accurate. Frequent or repeated duration errors. Rhythm problems occasionally detract from the overall performance.

The beat is usually erratic and rhythms are seldom accurate detracting significantly from the overall performance.

Attention in Class

Student is focused and attentive throughout class and follows directions to the best of his/her ability.

Student is usually focused and attentive during class, but sometimes is distracted by others.

Student is sometimes focused and attentive during class, but is easily distracted by others and sometimes distracts others.

Student is rarely focused and attentive during class. Sometimes disruptive to rest of class.

Expression and Performs with Style a creative nuance and style in response to the score and limited coaching.

Typically performs with nuance and style that is indicated in the score or which is suggested by instructor or peer.

Sometimes performs with nuance and style that is indicated in the score or which is suggested by instructor or peer.

Rarely demonstrates expression and style. Just plays the notes.

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